Developmental Milestones

Your Child’s Developmental Milestones

Every child develops at his or her own pace. Still, there are certain developmental milestones that you, as a parent, can watch for to see if your child is developing appropriately. The developmental milestones listed here give a general idea of the changes to expect. Don’t be alarmed if your own child’s development takes a slightly different course. However, if he or she falls short of a number of milestones, or is well behind his or her peers, consult your pediatrician.

Download the full version of the Developmental Milestones.

3 Months

At three months, a child begins to be more expressive and social. He or she should begin responding physically to his or her surroundings, and exerting some strength. The child will watch objects and faces, and start to babble pleasantly. For more milestones, click on icons below.

   

Alert your child’s doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible developmental delay for this age range:

7 Months

At seven months, your child should begin to respond to others’ expressions and enjoy social play. He or she will become curious about his or her surroundings, begin to respond to his or her own name, and babble long chains of sounds. The child will reach for objects with one hand, and learn to roll over and support weight on his or her legs. He or she also will be able to track moving objects with his or her eyes. For more milestones, click on icons below.

    

Alert your child’s doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible developmental delay for this age range:

1 Year

At one year, your child should show a real preference for his or her primary caregivers, imitate others when playing, and finger-feed him or herself. He or she will begin to use everyday objects correctly, respond to “no,” and say “dada” and “mama.” Most children will crawl, reach a sitting position without help, and walk holding onto furniture. The child should be able to put objects into and take objects out of a container and poke with an index finger. For more milestones, click on icons below.

    

Alert your child’s doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible developmental delay for this age range:

2 Years

At age two, your child should be imitating adults, enjoying children and showing increasing independence. The child will play make-believe, recognize the names of familiar people and objects, walk alone, and kick a ball. The child should also be scribbling on his or her own, building towers of four or more blocks, and possibly using one hand more than the other. For more milestones, click on icons below.

    

Alert your child’s doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible developmental delay for this age range:

3 Years

At age three, your child should spontaneously show affection and express a wide range of emotions. He or she should be able to separate objects by shape and color, play make-believe with dolls and people, understand more complex commands, and speak in sentences of four or five words. Climbing should be easy at this age, as should be running and bending over without falling. For more milestones, click on icons below.

    

Alert your child’s doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible developmental delay for this age range:

4 Years

At four years old, most children will be interested in new experiences and dress and undress themselves. The child should be able to correctly name some colors and recall parts of a story. He or she should speak in sentences of five or six words. Playing with a ball – throwing, kicking and catching – should be routine, and the child should be able to use scissors. For more milestones, click on icons below.

    

Alert your child’s doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible developmental delay for this age range:

5 Years

At age five, a child should want to be like friends, and like to sing, dance and act. The child should be able to count 10 or more objects, and better understand the concept of time. Most children will be able to tell longer stories and say their name and address. Hopping and somersaulting should be common, and the child should be able to dress and undress without help, and use a fork and spoon. For more milestones, click on icons below.

    

Alert your child’s doctor or nurse if your child displays any of the following signs of possible developmental delay for this age range: